April 2012

04

24

Apr

2012

 

For many career women, particularly single women, the big 30 kind of sneaks up on them. You are busy building your career, or exploring the world, or perhaps building your social networks (otherwise known as partying).

Before you know it, you enter your thirtieth year and something starts to happen in your mind.  Your biological clock may start ticking louder and louder, or your childhood and adolescent dreams may resurface as you ask yourself,

  • “Am I really where I wanted to be?”
  • “Is this how I imagined myself at 30?”
  • “Have I done what I thought I would do by now?”
  • “What happened to my dreams?”

It is no surprise that the book “Eat, Pray, Love” proved to be such a resounding success around the world.  Women in their late twenties and early thirties closely identified with the author as she put her life on hold and began exploring her goals and dreams.

Apparently a lot of women tend to enter some form of therapy or self-development as they reach their thirties.  They may feel a vague sense of dissatisfaction with their lives and want to explore ways of improving their lives.  Perhaps they come to a fork in the road and really need to question who they are and what they want to achieve.

So what can you?

Talk to friends about their life goals.  Try to remember your aspirations as a child or young adult.  You may want to decide on some milestones you’d like to achieve before you turn 30.

  • Perhaps take that trip you’ve always dreamed of.
  • Learn a new skill you’ve always wished to have.
  • Start saving for a deposit for your dream home.
  • Consider whether children figure in your future and how you might change your life to accommodate that commitment.

Perhaps now is the time to follow your dreams….

No comments yet

10

Apr

2012

Mid-life crisis at 30?

For many career women, particularly single women, the big 30 kind of sneaks up on them. You are busy building your career, or exploring the world, or perhaps building your social networks (otherwise known as partying).

Before you know it, you enter your thirtieth year and something starts to happen in your mind.  Your biological clock may start ticking louder and louder, or your childhood and adolescent dreams may resurface as you ask yourself,

  • “Am I really where I wanted to be?”
  • “Is this how I imagined myself at 30?”
  • “Have I done what I thought I would do by now?”
  • “What happened to my dreams?”

It is no surprise that the book “Eat, Pray, Love” proved to be such a resounding success around the world.  Women in their late twenties and early thirties closely identified with the author as she put her life on hold and began exploring her goals and dreams.

Apparently a lot of women tend to enter some form of therapy or self-development as they reach their thirties.  They may feel a vague sense of dissatisfaction with their lives and want to explore ways of improving their lives.  Perhaps they come to a fork in the road and really need to question who they are and what they want to achieve.

So what can you do?

Talk to friends about their life goals.  Try to remember your aspirations as a child or young adult.  You may want to decide on some milestones you’d like to achieve before you turn 30.

  • Perhaps take that trip you’ve always dreamed of.
  • Learn a new skill you’ve always wished to have.
  • Start saving for a deposit for your dream home.
  • Consider whether children figure in your future and how you might change your life to accommodate that commitment.

Perhaps now is the time to follow your dreams….

No comments yet

03

Apr

2012

Thelma & Louise is an all-time classic movie that every woman needs to watch at some point in her life.

It’s the perfect movie for a girl’s night in, watching with a bestie or sitting on the couch with a bottle of red, a box of chocolate truffles and a handful of tissues.

(It also has a very young Brad Pitt in one of his very first major acting roles ….sigh…)

One of the main themes and inspirations throughout the movie is Thelma and Louise’s growing appreciation of who they are as women, and realisation of the strength they have within themselves.

Along with some serious mishaps and terrible judgements along the way, it’s a journey of discovery.  They develop recognition of their own self-worth and the ability to overcome the things in life they thought they have no control over.  They learn that they most certainly can overcome whatever they choose.

What it can – and does – teach women is that they have an intrinsic strength that enables them to defeat anything that life throws at them. Yes, even the most horrible and heinous of actions against them.

It shows that friendship is an incredible resource and important thing to have in your life.

It demonstrates that life can throw anything at you at any time, and you will probably always make mistakes – and some really dumb ones at that – but nothing is insurmountable.

Mostly, however, it shows that we can get so caught up in our own heads that sometimes we think we can’t ask for the help we need … and asking for that help could be our ticket out of the hole we’re digging for ourselves in that moment.

Lastly, and don’t underestimate the importance of this point, it can teach that wearing headscarves in open-topped cars is not a terribly brilliant idea.  Make a note of that.

No comments yet

Facebook